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Independent photographers since about ten years, Christine and Franck Dziubak have a passion for animals, nature and travelling. They like to observe fauna and flora, to study the behaviors of the species and to photograph them, it is for them an art to live.
They dedicate themselves to the realization of wildlife reports, essentially in Central America, and are fascinated by the tropical forest and the wealth of this biodiversity.
A fine rain begins to fall. It is necessary to think surely about protecting the equipement and ourself. Let's hope that this fine rain doesn't turn into a big shower. We are in the cordillera of Talamanca at an altitude of more than 2000 meters in Costa Rica.
"It's nice to take pictures!" But It is also necessary to select and make the editing of all the photos. In the peninsula of Nicoya in Costa Rica, fortuitous meeting in April 2004 with this spider monkey (ateles geoffroyi) who had decided to remain some time in our company. Lucie, the name we gave her, had been rejected by her group. We will never know why. The latest news was that, she had joined another group in the dry tropical forest.
Along the Rio Tarcoles in Costa Rica, it is the moment for a session of macrophotography. After a long time following a butterfly, Christine has been abble to approach it.
Franck observes the banks of the Rio Tarcoles in Costa Rica.
In the peninsula of Nicoya in Costa Rica, after walking for a few hours in the dry tropical forest, we joined the nest in which a pair of Scarlet Macaw (ara macao) decided to settle. Christine, concentrated, waits with impatience for the moment when the Macaws are going to appear at the entry of the nest.
Pélican brun (pelecanus occidentalis) plonge pour pêcher sa proie. Quelle est-elle? Franck attend que le banc de poisson se rapproche du rivage pour mieux en saisir un juste avant son entrée dans l'eau bleu du Pacifique.
Christine photographes details of this big leaf called the "umbrella of the poor (gunnera tinctoria chilensis)." We are in the cordillera of Talamanca in Costa Rica.
March 2003, session of macro-photography, not far from Golfito, Costa Rica. This charming small frog of less than 4 cm long and a weight of around 3g is a green Dendrobate (dendrobates auratus). This small strongly colorful frog is also toxic. The seeing colors constitute a sign of warning for the predators. The sent message is clear: "Be careful, I am toxic, you'd better move away!".
After the shooting session, Christine controls her pictures. Cheers for the digital pictures!... Here, in April 2003, a shooting session with a pair of Blue-crowned Motmot (momotus momota) where the nest was installed in the banks of the Curû river, Costa Rica.
In the Curû wildlife refuge, in the middle of a field, we had located, a nest of Lineated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus lineatus) dug into the trunk of a dead palm tree. The male and the female didn't stop entering the nest and leaving it. They were arranging this cavity.
A pretty wooden bridge crosses the Curû river, in the Curû wildlife refuge, Costa Rica. Of course, we cross it!
Look!, Christine, look! You see what I am seing! - Yes, it's a pair of Scarlet Macaws. They are going back to their night place, not far from Carrara NP, Costa Rica.
Christine observes the out going of a couple of Lineated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus lineatus) in the trunk of a dead palm tree in the Curû wildlife refuge, Costa Rica.
The quetzal has just landed on a branch of an avocado tree close to us. It unveils us the whole beauty of the colors of its feathers. That day, the camera crackles in the cordillera of Talamanca in Costa Rica.
In the peninsula of Nicoya in Costa Rica, after walking for a few hours in the dry tropical forest, we joined the nest in which a pair of Scarlet Macaw (ara macao) decided to settle. Christine, concentrated, waits with impatience for the moment when the Macaws are going to appear at the entry of the nest.
DWhite face capuchin monkeys come near us, or at least cross the field where we were photographing a pair of Lineated Woodpeckers.